Conditions

Conditions

Enhancement and Conditions Submission Guidelines

Enhancements and Conditions

Enhancements and conditions are things that can be layered upon a species, a kind of addition. Technically conditions can be considered a kind of enhancement, but they are listed separately as they require additional guidelines and tend to be much more in depth in how it can affect the play of a character.


Enhancements

Things like super serums, prosthetics, cybernetics, surgical altercations are examples of enhancements that could be found in Sirian. While magical Tattoos alchemical serums, clock work armor, are examples of types that could be found in Vaxia. This is not an exhaustive list, but something to help get an idea on what we mean when we talk about enhancements.

In essence enhancements are non-contagious and can have many different origins, and basically just add something. These will take form in the game two ways: Flavor or Items. Flavor is an enhancement that is no more then an IC reason to have a certain spread of Stats or even a certain look to the character. It doesn't provide any kind of perk or drawback other than being there. If the enhancement is intend to do more then it will need to be an item that gives a bonus.

The only thing that limits enhancements from a Setting point of view is if it would fit within a setting. Other than that enhancements follow the same rules as any other item when providing a bonus - purchased or crafted.

See Also: Calculating Item Worth http://vaxia.org/wiki/crafting-rules


Conditions are additional aspects to a character that can be layered on top of your species. These are basically more involved and in depth types of enhancements and require more information when creating a new one.

Some conditions may only require additional player training to make sure they understand what it is they may be getting into, or to ensure that a player can handle a character with that condition and not play the character in a potentially offensive or harmful way.

http://vaxia.org/wiki/setting-approval-conditions

Condition Submission Guidelines

Conditions will be reviewed by both the System and Setting Department Some conditions come with difficulties on how to resist/purge it before it takes hold, and also may come with additional skills that get added once the Condition takes hold. Therefore System needs to overlook such aspects to make sure they are inline with the game mechanics, while Setting looks at the aspects to make sure the Condition fits with the theme/tone/mood of the setting and is appropriate. Social may also be asked to review a Condition to make sure that there is no violating any of the Code of Conduct and to be prepared to help train players if the Condition is allowed into play.

When design a condition the following information is needed:

Mechanics and logistics on how the Condition is spread or contracted

  • Is it contagious or not
  • How to resist it or chance of infection or onset
  • Difficulties to resist it
  • Amount of time given before the condition Sets in
Not all conditions may be contagious and there may be a specific set up in order to give someone a condition. From there it is about the mechanics of how the condition is introduced and basically its incubation period if any. Also a brief description for the player on what to expect during this part of the condition to help guide their play

What the Condition does to a person

  • What changes
    • mechanics for play
    • What should a player expect in play if their character gets the condition
  • Temporary or permanent
      If temporary then how long, if there are any additional mechanics for resisting or removing the condition sooner or anything that may prolong the condition.
Once a condition takes hold in a character the player needs to know how it will change their character. Some conditions may come with a skill (this will start at 0), some may potentially take a character out of play in some scenes (ie sunlight for vamps), or change their appearance, etc. There is a lot a condition may do so it is very important to be as clear as possible on what happens and and mechanics involving it.
It is also entirely possible to have a condition that is not permanent, much like a disease or sickness - but a player still needs to know what to expect during that time for their play.

If and how the Condition can be cured (if not open knowledge this still needs to be known and recorded with Setting at the time) - Not applicable to all conditions, only needed for those that act like diseases/infections.
  • Relevant mechanics and difficulties
  • Is there any risks to the cure

How the Condition is going to be introduced into play
When introducing something new into a setting there must be a plan of action to ensure the players are prepared - especially if it is something that can drastically affect their play and adds in a new facet of play that they have to adjust to. This is -extremely- important as we want people prepared for a new facet of play and be able to voice their concerns and adjust appropriately.

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Setting Approval for Mental Disorders

See Setting Approval for PCs for more details.

Mental Disorder Conditions are a specific subset of character concept Conditions that fall under the guidelines of restricted conditions. These disorders (in layman's terms) are not an exhaustive list, and like any Condition a new disorder may be reviewed under the Guidelines to see if it needs to be restricted.

Both "Other" species and "Conditions" require approval from the Setting Department for play.

Playing these characters is a privilege - not a right. Setting can revoke approval and pull a character from play if it becomes abusive or disruptive..

Why We Do This

Mental disorders are tricky to play well in any setting. We have understanding and consideration for those who have these conditions in real life. This is not intended to pass judgement on those who have these disorders. But for the game settings, we need to make note of disorders that are particularly disruptive in a roleplaying context. See Setting Approval for Conditions for details.

It it worth noting that when you play one of these characters you need to be playing them because you want to play the *character*. Tossing a character into the situation "just to mess with other players" or "just for the lulz" is griefing. Play the character for yourself - other players are not there to be your experimental lab. If we suspect you are playing a character with these conditions in order to grief - your approval for the character will be revoked.

Example Mental Disorders

This is not an exhaustive list. New disorders may be reviewed and added to the list. This list is in "layman's terms". Some of these disorders may not be accurately named or even exist medically. We only list these disorders as used in a roleplaying context.

Sociopathy / Psychopathy

Same problem different levels of aggression vs thought. Dexter. Hannibal Lector. Etc etc. The problem here is a an issue of degree. This is like "playing an evil character" dialed to 11. Players with characters that have these conditions sometimes will use "the character did it not me" as an excuse to avoid the OOC reactions of other players whose characters have been hurt. While we don't want the OOC to influence the IC, never forget that you are playing in the context of a game with people who are supposedly your friends. You don't want to hurt real life people.

The vast majority of characters, or at least fantasy characters, would be considered serial or mass murderers, thieves and possibly war profiteers. There's a level of 'acceptable play' that comes with the territory - so this isn't about calling out someone on their specific instances of play. For the psychopaths / sociopaths conditions we're looking at the self-identified concepts only. Basically the "I want to play a serial killer and run around wearing a woman-skin" sort of concepts. For example: Dexter or Hannibal Lecter.

In the wrong hands, this can be an invitation to griefing and extremely disruptive to play.

Prerequisites to Play
Before a character with this sub-type of Mental Disorder is approved for play, the player will need to pass the Social Walkthrough. The player will also need be up-to-date on the consent standards on site before playing this concept.

Amnesia

Amnesiacs can be a lot of fun, but the problem is it can be really disruptive to the rest of the players. There's a 'everyone pay attention to meeeeeee' tendency that can pop up with these. It can be very spotlight grabby as the amnesiac constantly tries to turn the scene towards their situation and history.

Secondly, this can be used as a way to sneak a backplot for a character in during play where it wouldn't have gotten Setting approval. For example: If we approve an amnesiac mage, only to find out the player is 'recovering the memories of having been a king' in his casual RP when we would never have approved a king in the first place - then that's a problem.

Amnesiacs should write down what they remember, and what they don't remember but have already set for themselves before play. And after play, it's an open field for the A/SHs to set the things you haven't set.

There's no take-backsies here. If you didn't put it in the background before - you can't arbitrarily add a major background element afterwards. That wasn't the character we approved for play, which raises the third issue, this can be a lot of work dumped in the laps of our A/SHs. We just might not have enough time to really help develop the background so it can be disappointing to the player.

Prerequisites to Play
Before a character with this sub-type of Mental Disorder is approved for play, the player will need to provide us a backstory even if the character does not know the details. Any significant gaps in missing memory not already filled in before approval cannot be back-filled by the player afterwards. Gaps are left to the A/SH's to fill after approval.

Multiple Personality Disorder

Like a cross between Sociopathy / Psychopathy and Amnesia. This one is often used as just a wild collection of 'weird shit'. Depending on the character's personality at the time they may work in a session. But it can be extremely disruptive in casual play to the point of making character bonding almost impossible. Sadly, that's most of the play opportunities on this site. There is also the risk that a player may use a MPD condition as an excuse to play any of the other more-or-less troublesome conditions without running it past anyone or warning anyone about it first. So - again, the risk of griefing is high.

Prerequisites to Play
Before a character with this sub-type of Mental Disorder is approved for play, the player will need to provide us descriptions and personalities for each of the personalities of the character. Each will need to be approved individually. Additional personalities cannot be added after approval.

Spontaneous Audio / Visual Hallucinations

There are plenty of diviner concepts that have this and handle it perfectly well, and characters who have been affected by spell or drug can get this too. The concept itself isn't bad. This one is on the list more for logistical reasons. It can be tricky to play in a session without throwing people for a loop, so it can get disruptive and be extremely confusing to play a scene with.

Unlike a tabletop game where the look of confusion on a player's face may get a quick OOC explanation in a text based game that explanation often takes too long to type. This leads to confusion and worry on the part of an A/SH that they've described something poorly, or even other players mistaking a player's described hallucination as an actual thing in the scene. So for this one, we just need to know about it in advance.

Prerequisites to Play
Before a character with this sub-type of Mental Disorder is approved for play, the player will need to give us a list of triggering events that cause the audio or visual hallucinations. The player will also need to be up-to-date on site training to avoid disrupting play with this concept.

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Setting Approval for Conditions

See Setting Approval for PCs for more details.

"Conditions" are additional aspects to a character that can be layered on top of your species. For example: Vampirism or the Were-beast curse.

Both "Other" species and "Conditions" require approval from the Setting Department for play.

Why We Do This

Character concepts are as wild and varied as your imagination. The problem is - your imagination and that of those around you don't always fit together well. There are certain common concepts that we require Setting approval for.

Please understand Setting approval for a Condition is not guaranteed.

Because conditions can be troublesome - they may have their own rules, or the condition may be disruptive in play - we need to know that any player with a character with a Condition is able to play without disrupting the site.

In order to play a character with a Condition:

You need to pass the associated training for the condition. The training will get you up to date on all the information you'll need to play the character. This way we know for sure that you've read it all and know what you're signing up for. Ignorance will not be an excuse.

We'll also need for you to have 40 HXP on your account from playing on site. We want you to know the world and the community before playing something off-model and this is the only way we can know for sure you have that experience.

Why Are These Things Conditions?

These are our guidelines for looking at a Condition to see if it requires approval. Conditions not already listed here will be reviewed using this guideline to see if they need to be restricted. By defining the guidelines on this stuff we make it easier for a player to know what they need to do in order to qualify, and keep someone in a position of power from making an arbitrary unfair decision that can't be challenged. We use the following considerations when reviewing Conditions:

a) The concept has significant risk of OOC issues that may require Social to step in to sort things out.

b) The concept makes it difficult for the character to interact at-all in sessions or casual play.

c) The concept may be abused, allowing the character to attempt to justify circumventing Setting approval in acquiring or using other special abilities or powers.

d) The concept requires a warning label. It comes with setting based extra-trouble the player is signing up for.

e) The concept requires a user manual. It comes with mechanical limitations on play.

f) The concept is at risk of real-world legal or social liability.

In order to be considered for a possible classification as a Setting approval needed Condition - the Condition should fall under at least two of these categories, ideally three. With the exception of e and f - any Condition that falls under e or f is automatically restricted to needing approval.

Defined Conditions

The following conditions have been reviewed by the Setting department and are available on character sheets. Not all Condition concepts are listed here - and where not listed they may be reviewed under the Guidelines to see if we need to restrict the condition or not.

Vampirism

A vampire may only be played in Vaxia. There are many types of Vampires but they all fall under the Setting Approval required restriction.

a) There may be serious OOC consent issues for blood-drinkers and mind-magic / Kosmos vamps.
b) Play may be restricted by daylight sessions.
d) NPCs may be biased and/or wary of the character.
e) The vampire is subject to special rules for blood and sunlight exposure.

Were-beast

A were-beast may only be played in Vaxia. There are many types of were-beasts, but they all fall under the Setting Approval required restriction.

a) There may be serious OOC consent issues for biting other PCs and spreading the curse.
b) Play may be restricted by the moon cycle.
d) NPCs may be biased and/or wary of the character.
e) The were-beast is subject to special rules for the moon cycle and bite exposure.

Digital Metalborn

A digital metalborn may only be played in Sirian. While normal metalborn (robots) are open for play without approval, a digital metalborn has no robotic body - they are purely digital.

b) Play may be restricted by lack of net-access, radios, or electricity.
e) The digital metalborn is subject to special rules for possessing temporary robotic bodies.

Psionic or magic-user in Sirian

Psionic and magical characters in Sirian are at risk of becoming Crowned. While the character is, for the most part, just like a magical user in Vaxia there are additional rules to consider in Sirian.

a) Higher levels of Crowned points may remove player agency or restrict the character in play.
d) NPCs may be biased and/or wary of the character.
e) There are special rules for magic when casting in Sirian - rolling doubles.

Mental Disorder

Most mental issues are perfectly fine and we just ask players to be respectful of them as they play - no additional approvals needed. But there are some specific conditions that are more difficult in a roleplaying context. We have understanding and consideration for those who have these conditions in real life. This is not intended to pass judgement on those who have these disorders. But for the game settings, we need to make note of disorders that are particularly disruptive in a roleplaying context. See Setting Approval for Mental Disorders for a detailed list of the mental disorders currently requiring approval.

a) There may be serious RLH issues that come up in play, as well as consent issues.
b) Play may be limited as a result of the condition.
c) The condition may be used as an excuse to allow playing something not approved by Setting.
d) NPCs may be biased and/or wary of the character.

Underage or Looking Underage

We don't differentiate between the two because the legal system or a HR department won't necessarily see the difference. We have players from many areas of the world, and they may experience real-world harm (job or reputation loss for example) if an underage character is not handled with care. This is also covered under our Harassment Policy

a) A player may feel their RP can be blocked due to the treatment of their underage character.
b) There is often a disconnect between very young and much older characters, and older characters will often assume an authoritative role over the under age character to try and protect them which could keep them out of certain actions.
f) An underage character is simply not appropriate for some scenes and topics. In particular those of a romantic or sexual nature. Period.

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Setting Approval for PCs

"Other" is a catchall species that we have available for players who have an idea that just doesn't fit in with anything else.

"Conditions" are additional aspects to a character that can be layered on top of your species. For example: Vampirism or the Were-beast curse.

Both "Other" species and "Conditions" require approval from the Setting Department for play.

Playing these characters is a privilege - not a right. Setting can revoke approval and pull a character from play if it becomes abusive or disruptive..

But we also want to be able to use a set of guides so you'll know what to aim for, and our Setting department can clearly tell you why your character concept works or doesn't work.

Why We Do This

The Setting department is the voice of authority on wither or not your concept is able to exist in the setting or not. We determine if it fits and address any concerns with making sure the concept works for play. We need to protect the mood and tone of the setting for other players to be able to play. Extreme breaks with the expected tone or mood can destroy the setting for other players.

Please understand when you are making an Other character that the default answer is no.

Even with a yes, you may be asked to make sizable changes to avoid breaking the setting for others. If you are interested in building out a player species (so you can play them without needing to get approval) take a look at the submission requirements for playable species.

Limits of Setting Authority

The System Department handles numbers!

Please do not build any concepts around a special ability without expecting to pay for the skill with XP. Remember "no free lunch". If you expect your concept to require special rules you will want to contact System to make sure that end of things is covered.

Prerequisites

We want to make sure a player is well equipped for playing these species before they get out there. Some species require extra consideration when playing them. In order to make sure you're prepared for them we have two requirements.

You need to pass the associated training for the species. The training will get you up to date on all the information you'll need to play the character. This way we know for sure that you've read it all and know what you're signing up for. Ignorance will not be an excuse.

We'll also need for you to have 40 HXP on your account from playing on site. We want you to know the world and the community before playing something off-model and this is the only way we can know for sure you have that experience.

Other "Others"

Please keep in mind that in that for characters that aren't an established "Other" species, the default answer is a 'No'. We will need to take a close look at the species to consider if it fits within the expectations for the setting's mood and tone. We will also need to consider if it is a species that is fitting for play with other characters, and if more than one player may be interested in playing the species.

If you have an off or weird concept character - and you *don't* want to go through the work of creating a new player species for all players to get to play - then you are *far* more likely to get Setting approval for the character if you ensure that there is an reason in your background that there is only one. A unique result of an experiment or environmental circumstance or the like.

Additional Notes:

You'll notice we don't have population numbers as a consideration for approving Others! This is because limiting the numbers that can play a concept is a violation of the principle of Fun. If the entire player base wants to play pirate characters for a summer or hop over to Dessingdale for something new... they can and should!

But because this has come up lets go into some details on the usual counter arguments so you can follow our logic here.

Regional trends

There are some areas of the world where a given species is more common or less common than others. Setting will make an effort to make it clear if the area you're in is more human and half-elf or orc, or as dense as Delhi or thinly populated as the middle of the Sahara. But! The percentages of player characters is never going to approach those of the population and there are always outliers in any given population.

When looking at the population of a city, country, or the world we are talking in terms of billions. The available population for a given species of condition is just going to be that large. Certainly large enough that the population of players is barely a drop in the bucket. (If that ever changes, we have an entirely other problem: our server is burnt to the ground under the user traffic.)

The numbers just don't scale large enough for us to consider that to be a problem for Other characters.

Player demographics vs. Population demographics

There is no obligation for player population demographics to reflect general population demographics. We don't have quotas! There is no minimum number of humans required in play or a maximum number of Elves allowed. There's no reason to place these limits on Other/Condition species either. There is absolutely nothing saying the entire player base can't decide to pop over to GHOUL to play a summer-worth of vampiric intrigue!

If the players are having Fun, we're not going to block them.

Why are there so many good neth in Ramsalon

Outliers for any population exist - pacifist Orcs industrialist Lurai good neth, racial-purity elves, vegetarian (or at least non-sentient blood source) Vampires Again, player numbers are so small compared to overall population numbers that the players aren't even a drop in the bucket.

As for Ramsalon: If the individual in question was comfortable in their native society then they would still be at home. A non-stereotypical example of a species is more likely to be found in Ramsalon due to self-selection bias. It's a major port with a reputation for adventures and fortunes to be made. It serves the same purpose as New York: the place to start over, where you have a chance regardless of how much you couldn't cut it at home. So, of course it's the place where outcasts will migrate to to get their big break!

We will certainly encourage a variety of character concepts to try to avoid having the same kind of outlier all the time but if a player won't have fun playing it we won't force them to do so. That's a violation of player Freedom and Fun.

Characters that also require Setting approval are subject to at times fall under review. Should enough complaints or other evidence be presented that a player is violating any of the Site Policies or CoC, or just show they are incapable of handling the style of play, Setting will investigate the character and role play and that character may be removed from play should any violations or mishandling be found.

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Undead

Undead
The Undead as a class, encompass a variety of different things. In general, though, the undead are anything that was once dead, but now has some semblance of life. Living things resurrected by holy magic or life magic are excluded, and anything created with necromancy is usually included.

Nearly all undead, like most cursed individuals, have an unnatural aura, which animals (especially horses) can sense and are terrified of.

A near-infinite variety of undead can exist, limited only by the talent and creativity of a necromancer. The most common forms include the following:

    Druj
    ---
    Ghosts Ghosts are the metaphysical remains of deceased persons who have not yet wandered into the Shadow Realm usually for natural reasons. Most commonly, ghosts will remain if the manner of death was violent, or if the ghost has some connection to something in the world.
    Lichs Lichs (or liches) are the most powerful of undead creatures. They are a special case, rarer, as undead go, but still some of the most feared and terrifying of any monsters. Soulless and immortal, they are free-willed and evil, and even if there were mortal men stupid enough to attempt to control one, it would be impossible to summon the power.
    Skeletons Generally, the skeleton is an internal array of bones (or external case of chitin, in the case of exoskeletal creatures) that serves as a support structure for most animals. In Vaxian usage, however, it usually refers to animated skeletons, which are undead creatures like Zombies but whose flesh has all decomposed away and who are usually given weapons. They are animated by necromancers, who control them like puppets.
    Vampires Vampires in Vaxia are mostly undead, individuals who have been cursed and brought back to a form of half-life by another vampire. There are many different clans of vampire, with differing abilities. Vampyres are just the same, the only real difference being that they can't spell correctly.

    Vaxia/Races/Undead/Wights Wights are undead creatures that are similar in construction to Vaxia/Races/Undead/Zombies and Vaxia/Races/Undead/Skeletons, in that they are raised from dead bodies by necromancy. However, they somehow have slightly more free will than the others, and are often given armor.
    Wraiths : Wraiths and Shades
    Wraiths and shades are barely-corporeal undead creatures which are created by necromancy. A necromancer fishes a recently-deceased soul out of the Shadow Realm and gives it form. The resulting creature is fairly independent, but not sapient, and can best be described as rage given form. If the necromancer fails to keep tight control over his wraiths, they may turn on and kill him. They are something like thick black clouds or thin black sheets, and are often, but not always, given metal claws.

    Zombies
    Zombies are undead creatures with no mind of their own. A necromancer raises a fresh corpse from the dead, and operates it as a puppet.

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Skeletons

Skeletons

Generally, the skeleton is an internal array of bones (or external case of chitin, in the case of exoskeletal creatures) that serves as a support structure for most animals. In Vaxian usage, however, it usually refers to animated Skeletons which are Undead creatures like Zombies but whose flesh has all decomposed away and who are usually given weapons. They are animated by necromancers, who control them like puppets. If the necromancer should lose control or interest, the skeleton will usually collapse into a pile of bones, though occasionally it will go on a mindless rampage. Behavior when uncontrolled is the major difference between skeletons and zombies, besides the flesh thing.

Animated skeletons are a little harder to make than zombies, primarily because while a zombie can use the existing flesh and muscle to stay intact, skeletons stay coherent only because the magic keeps them so. This means that a skeleton can usually reassemble itself when damaged, unless the spell that powers it runs out of energy. Your best bet with a skeleton is to kill the necromancer that controls it, then smash it until it stops putting itself back together.

Creation and Ruling
Creation of an animated skeleton obviously requires a skeleton. The difficulty to reanimate this skeleton can be anywhere from 70 plus 30 Added Difficulty (if the skeleton is clean is fresh and the surroundings are conducive to necromancy) to 90 plus 30 Added Difficulty. Increase difficulty by 10 for each undead creature already under the necromancer's control, excluding those which have any free will of their own.

Once he has brought his creation to "life", the necromancer can attempt to seal the spell into his creation to make it last more than the standard few hours, which works the same way as enchantment (and uses the difficulties under 'extending a spell effect' on that page).

Unless subverted by another necromancer, the zombie should obey all orders from its master unquestioningly.
Stats are as follows:

    Life: Equal to the spell's Points Produced.
    Endurance: A skeleton's endurance is always 25.
    Strength: Equal to the spell's Points Produced.
    Dexterity: Equal to the spell's Points Produced.
    Intelligence: Equal to the Points Produced, divided by 9.
    Spirituality: Skeletons always have zero spirituality.
    Charisma: Skeletons always have zero charisma.
    Skills: Skeletons can be given skills at the caster's discretion. They will be equal to the Points Produced, but every skill added increases the difficulty of the spell by 15. Examples of possible skills:
      Physical Combat: A skeleton can be given a physical combat skill. It can be given a skill for the use of a weapon, if it is given one.
      Awareness: Skeletons can be given awareness skills, limited to two senses like any awareness skill.
      Intimidation: Skeletons can be given an intimidation skill.
      Magic: Skeletons cannot use magic per se. However, if the caster is himself any other sort of mage, he can imbue his creations with the essence of a magic. For example, a mage who is both a necromancer and a pyromancer can create fire-breathing skeletons. This requires a separate roll for imbuing the magic.
      Other Skills: Up to the discretion of the SH and the caster.
    All the stats and skills of a skeleton are subject to a hard cap of 75, and cannot be higher than that except under extraordinary circumstances.

See Also
Vaxia/Races/Undead/Wights are like skeletons, but are usually given armor and a small degree of free will.

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Wights

Wights
Wights are Undead creatures that are similar in construction to Vaxia/Races/Undead/Zombies and Vaxia/Races/Undead/Skeletons, in that they are raised from dead bodies by necromancy. However, they somehow have slightly more free will than the others, and are often given armor.

They are as hard to kill as Zombies or Skeletons with the added problem that you have to get through an exoskeleton, too, although they do tend to be somewhat slower. Generally, I think it’s wise to simply avoid wights, if you see them. Pushing them off a cliff, into a pit, or off a boat is usually a fairly effective measure for getting them out of your hair.

Creation and Ruling
Creation of a wight requires a skeleton, armor (usually light metal plate, though most kinds of armor works just as well), and a weapon. The skeleton is reanimated while wearing the armor, at a difficulty which can be anywhere from 70 plus 60 Added Difficulty (if the skeleton is clean is fresh, the surroundings are conducive to necromancy, and the armor fits well) to 90 plus 60 Added Difficulty. Increase difficulty by 10 for each undead creature already under the necromancer's control, excluding those which have any free will of their own.

Once he has brought his creation to "life", the necromancer can attempt to seal the spell into his creation to make it last more than the standard few hours, which works the same way as enchantment (and uses the difficulties under 'extending a spell effect' on that page).

Unless subverted by another necromancer, the wight should obey all orders from its master unquestioningly.
Stats are as follows:

    Life: Equal to the spell's Points Produced.
    Endurance: A wight's endurance is always 25, plus the endurance bonus of the armor it is made with.
    Strength: Equal to the spell's Points Produced.
    Dexterity: Equal to the spell's Points Produced, minus the dexterity penalty of the armor it is made with.
    Intelligence: Equal to the Points Produced, divided by 7.
    Spirituality: Wights always have zero spirituality.
    Charisma: Wights always have zero charisma.
    Skills: Wights can be given skills at the caster's discretion. They will be equal to the Points Produced, but every skill added increases the difficulty of the spell by 15. Examples of possible skills:
      Physical Combat: A wight can be given a physical combat skill. It can be given a skill for the use of a weapon, if it is given one.
      Awareness: Wights can be given awareness skills, limited to two senses like any awareness skill.
      Intimidation: Wights can be given an intimidation skill.
      Magic: Wights cannot use magic per se. However, if the caster is himself any other sort of mage, he can imbue his creations with the essence of a magic. For example, a mage who is both a necromancer and a pyromancer can create fire-breathing wights. This requires a separate roll for imbuing the magic.
      Other Skills: Up to the discretion of the SH and the caster.
    All the stats and skills of a wight are subject to a hard cap of 100, and cannot be higher than that except under extraordinary circumstances.
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Nine Moons

Nine Moons
Nine Moons are the "original" type of vampire, dating back to before the Cataclysm, from which all other vampire templates were copied. They were created by Averatos who has been compared to a pre-Cataclysm Necromos They are rumored to be extinct, and if they are not, then they are extremely secretive and extremely good at keeping themselves hidden, because not much is known about them, and there has not been a confirmed sighting of a Nine Moons for many centuries. Nine Moons are the most powerful of Vampires and are rumored to be somehow undetectable to holy magic and necromancy. Certain conspiracy theories have the Nine Moons Clan as a secret shadow government, like the Illuminati. One of the few things known about them is that they are associated with a symbol called the Tanhasaar which consists of nine points and nine lines.

The Nine Moons vampires are very evil, glorying in the suffering of innocents and working towards a return to Averatos's ideals. The best thing that can be said for them is that they will never deign to work with any other 'evil' groups: they feel that Necromos is nothing more than an incompetent plagiarist, all other vampire clans are cheap knockoffs not worthy of existing, and all other 'evil' people are simply beneath contempt. They do not, however, hesitate to trick other 'evil' groups into working towards their own ends.

Targets for Turning
The process of creating a new Nine Moons vampire is more complicated than any other. It is a week-long process only understood by the Nine Moons masters themselves. They only ever transform individuals who fulfill the following criteria:

  • Must be a very powerful sorcerer in their own right, preferably a necromancer.
  • Must be totally loyal to the Nine Moons organization and agree with all their philosophies, especially their love for Averatos's legacy.
  • Must pass a series of tests, which can take almost any form and may not be identified as such to the candidate.

Skill Affinity
Many Night Moons vampires study and practice necromancy, fascinated with death and the Undead They often consider themselves to be among them, having 'died' when they were cursed.

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LanCorian

Lan Corians

The LanCorian Vampires came into being when a large group of Bloody Shroud were imprisoned in Grokul prison by Emperor Minos. To ensure their survival in the sealed prison, some changes were made to the basic vampire template, orchestrated by Don Julian, the leader. These vampires began eating flesh as well as blood, to maximize the benefit from feeding, and found a way to reproduce sexually.

Culture
The LanCorians are powerfully family-oriented, and consider themselves the aristocracy of vampires, living in large mansions and favouring frequent fancy dress parties. Nearly all LanCorians live with large families known as clans and are led by Corianders.

Corianders are the leaders and protectors of the indvidual LanCorian clans. They are generally elected in some form by the clan.

Don Julian was the only Supreme Coriander, whom was even above and in charge of each clan Coriander, and those without a clan. Since his demise there has not been another which has caused for some interesting turmoil for those that find themselves without a clan. These clan-less, ones are often called rogue LanCorians, and tend to have a much lower status with those in a clan, even mocked, and ostracized. They are rare, but do exist, shunning all LanCorian culture and acting as a rebel due to their treatment.

    Naming
    A newly-turned LanCorian will keep his original name, and will add the name of the Coriander's family and LanCorian to it.
    If a LanCorian is born in the normal fashion, then they tend to not get a family name, only LanCorian. They can earn the family name by serving as a donor.
    If a new Coriander takes control of a clan, they all keep their old family names, but the Coriander usually chooses a new one for themself. From then on, all donors and new vampires that Coriander makes will take on their new family name.
    The names Julian, Julia, Julius, and other variants are quite consistently prevalent among the LanCorians.

Physiology
LanCorians, like most vampires, do not maintain homeostasis or produce any heat, and thus remain at the ambient room temperature of their surroundings. They also do not sweat or produce skin oils, and do not need to breathe (except to speak), and the only secondary bodily systems that remain fully functional are the digestive system (slightly modified to convert flesh into necromantic energy) and the reproductive system.
A child has a 50% chance to be born a LanCorian if one of the parent's is a LanCorian, if both of the parents are LanCorian then the child will also be a LanCorian.

LanCorians can take on attributes of whatever they feed on, if they feed on enough of it. It is due to this that LanCorian's tend to avoid feeding on the same thing for too long, and many avoid certain creatures of whose attributes they wish to avoid at all costs.
Many rogue, LanCorians, such as Elissa the Crow, deliberately maintain permanent animalistic characteristics, often favoring feathers or scales, as an act of defiance towards other LanCorian's.

Targets for Turning
Any aristocrat or prominent influential individual can find themselves a target for a LanCorian. They favor prestige, and will often seek to turn several generations of a given family to establish a new cluster of vampires, rather than stopping with one individual.

Skill Affinity
Persuasion skills are common among the LanCorian, though many have them from before their turning. They also collect various lore skills to sate a general intellectual curiosity, often favoring history, though not exclusively. Any advanced discipline, like metamagic, biomancy or rune magic, is also a likely pick for a LanCorian.

LanCorian Clans

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This organization does NOT have goals
Membership Size: 
200
Diplomatic Influence: 
25
Material Strength: 
25
Economic Influence: 
25

Muratori Vampires

Muratori Vampires

The Muratori Vampires are essentially Ghosts with teeth. When Emperor Jhad razed the city of Muratori to the ground, killing everyone in it, the inhabitants remained in the Vaxian realm as dreads, and the apprentice of Necromos named Muratos, now the leader of the Muratori, twisted them further for his own purposes. The city itself somehow has a reflection in the Shadow Realm which the Muratori have a strong connection to. While the real city of Muratori is a long-dead ruin, the shadow reflection burns with a perpetual fire.

Targets for Turning
Summoners are common targets for the Muratori, as are strong mages of nearly every variety.

Skill Affinity
Shadow magic is common among the Muratori Vampires specifically with the ability to turn into raw shadow essence for sustained periods. Given their targets, metamagic is also fairly common, as it's a useful tool to weaken or disrupt those they would hope to turn.

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